Ashworth on NCARB Live Webinar, Jan 2015

Tyler Ashworth was recently featured on the NCARB Live webinar series, a live filmed webinar broadcast from NCARB’s national office located in Washington DC.

Ashworth was a guest along with Robert Holzbach, Director of Staffing at Hickok Cole Architects, and Kimberly Tuttle, Outreach Manager for Internship + Education at NCARB.

Titled “Architecture Career Tips” Ashworth and others discussed everything from what to focus on in your resume and portfolio, how to use your professional network to land a job, interview tips, salary negotiations, and more. The webinar was one of the more successful in NCARB’s series drawing in over 500+ viewers. The recording of the webinar, originally aired on Jan 15, 2015 can be seen in full length at the link below.

http://blog.ncarb.org/2015/January/Watch-Career-Tips.aspx

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Appointment to NAAB Board

naab_logoOn Tuesday April 16, 2013 the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB) met in a special session to elect four new directors, which included the appointment of Tyler Ashworth for a two year term.

The new Director appointments will officially begin with the conclusion of the 2013 Annual Meeting of the NAAB Board of Directors in October. The other new directors named are:

Brian P. Kelly, AIA
Tamara Redburn, AIA, NCARB, LEED AP
Scott C. Veazey, AIA, NCARB

The NAAB, founded in 1940, is the sole accrediting body for professional schools of architecture in the US. It is the vision of the NAAB to be the leader in establishing educational quality assurance standards to enhance the value, relevance, and effectiveness of the architectural profession. The accrediting board achieves this by developing and maintaining a system of accreditation in professional architecture education that is responsive to the needs of society and allows institutions with varying resources and circumstances to evolve according to their individual needs.

Additional information on the NAAB can be found on their website below:

http://www.naab.org

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Ashworth Speaking @ AIA DesignDC – Sept 2013

Just announced, Tyler Ashworth will be leading an educational session at Design DC, AIA’s regional architecture conference being held in Washington DC in September 2013. The session, titled “Possible Futures of Architecture + The new role of architectural education” will explore trends in the ever changing architecture profession, both systematic and market-driven. Tyler Ashworth, along with panelists Joe Lai and Anna McCorvey, (all 3 designers at Wiencek + Associates Architects) will be discussing changes in the way we practice architecture and how schools of architecture must adapt and respond to these changes. Emphasis will be given to the views of emerging professionals – the young generation of recent graduates and young architects working in and around the architecture profession today.

The Design DC conference runs September 25-27, more information at the link below.

http://aiadesigndc.net/index.html

Tyler Ashworth will be presenting “Possible Futures of Architecture” on Thurs. Sept. 26 @ 10:45a in the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington DC.

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Ashworth Speaking @ University of Maryland – April 2013

Tyler Ashworth will be a keynote as part of University of Maryland’s School of Architecture Planning & Preservation 2013 Lecture Series. Tyler will be moderating 4 other panelists, all emerging design professionals and graduates of architecture school. The panel diverse in makeup will include a PhD candidate of MIT, a future City Councilor in Maryland, and a architectural designer in DC with a Masters in city + urban planning from UC Berkeley.

More information on the panel taking place on April 17 2013 can be found at University of Maryland’s website below.

http://www.arch.umd.edu/news_and_events/index.cfm?id=7841

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HKS Design Fellowship, 2012, Mid Atlantic

Tyler Ashworth was recently recognized for his work as an HKS Design Fellow. In Feb 2012 Tyler was selected to participate in a weekend long design charette with a team of 3 others. The teams and design project, part of the HKS Design Fellowship program approached an adaptive reuse project for the Historic U-Line Arena (Washington Coliseum) in Washington, D.C. 3 design teams worked with the NoMa Business Improvement District and a local children’s music education non-profit to come up with conceptual designs for what would be Washington DC’s first music museum complete with interactive children’s educational spaces.

pedestrian walk along arena

pedestrian walk along arena

An article on the design project featured in the Washington Post can be found linked below.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/where-we-live/post/whats-going-on-withuline-arena/2012/01/12/gIQAGdh3tP_blog.html

More information on the HKS Fellowship and images from Tyler’s teams work as well as other teams can be found on the HKS website below.

http://hksinc.com/hksdf_mid-atlantic/charette.html

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Japan: The Arrival Pt II

Friday 23.10.2011
Tokyo Narita Airport
Tokyo, Japan

>> Boarded the Skyliner Express to Ueno Park, 2800 Yen, roughly equivalent to $30+ USD. Too shakey to write at the moment, otherwise there would be more to say. Likely that and the 24 hour travel fatigue.

narita skyliner express

narita skyliner express

>> Somehow you always expect landscapes to seem more diverse, more outer-worldly…

japan

japan

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Japan: The Arrival Pt I

Friday 23.10.2011
Beijing International Airport
Beijing, China

>> Somehow Thursday disappeared. Never really happened actually. We all left our respective stateside homes thru the day Wednesday. DCA –> LAX … DET –> LAX … LAS –> LAX. We re-connected in LAX at the international terminal and experienced a first – waiting for the ticket counter to open. No prior check-in online, no seat reservations. No expectations. Not on Air China at least – that is, other than excitement, anxiety, and general awe over the 12 hour flight to come. The LAX Roadhouse Route 66 bar and diner served up our final helpings of Americana for a week or more with libations to assist.

Air China

Air China

>> We are sitting in Row 37 – A, B, & C on a Boeing 747-400 Air China Flight 984 direct to Beijing with transfer to a 777, Flight 925 servicing us thru to the final destination, Tokyo Japan. With a 16+ hour difference on PDT (+13 on EDT) we figured we were best to stay up for the first 2 hours or so, leaving us with 9 to rest before arriving at 4:45a local…seamlessly resetting our body clocks, or so it seemed. After delaying nagging cat-naps for the real thing, dinner was served 1 hr post take off. Red wine paired with sauced beef, rice, green beans, and a dinner roll. Tuna salad was also a side but had to be avoided. Already a sign of my impending troubles with avoiding fish on an island known for its great seafood. The real treat was the pinneapple shortbread, like a fig newton but with a pinneapple center and much thicker.

Onboard

Onboard

>> Thanks to a Hydrocodone left over from a wisdom tooth removal, a Tylenol Cold PM, and the wine, sleep came easy. As opposed to the Italy flight in 2009 where I watched all 3 movies – on this flight I had a mission to rest. I think I got around a solid 5 hr rest shifting every 50 min. or so.

>> The 3 of us de-board at Beijing…4:50a. First thought is to the cameras and documenting the experience and amazing space. Somehow no big surprise for a bunch of architecture students to get caught up in ceiling joint details or handrail hardware finishes. All and all though, Beijing has a damn impressive air terminal, a cathedral to air travel.

beijing intntl airport

beijing intntl airport

>> The funny thing is how airport language is so strong, so uniform, you don’t feel as if you are anywhere different. Only the subtitles in native language and script tell you you are in fact somewhere else.

>> As we sat in the Beijing terminal we were all fairly tired, disoriented, and for the most part wondering where Thursday went. To add to our disorientation consider…for $140 RMB (equivalent to CNY I suppose) we get 1 capuccino, 1 double espresso, and 1 American coffee to go. As it turns out from asking the gentleman at a different duty free type store, $1 USD = 6.8 RMB. So $22 USD later + a credit card service fee we have 3 empty coffees, a slight caffeine jolt, and our first international lesson learned.

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Italy: Lost in translation

Perugia Fountain

Perugia Fountain

[I will prelude this blog, acknowledging it has been some time since I have posted, and this blog should be the first of many recalling journals from my sketchbook in order to help catch some of you up with the places I have seen and people I have met…]

Sitting in Perugia this weekend, I came to realize there is much I still do not know. Most notably, 4 other languages, or even one language well enough to fake it.

As I was sketching in Piazza Italia, an old man came and sat down next me. After looking over my sketch he began to talk to me. This was the difficult part however. Initially we went back and forth trying to find a language to speak in. I was able to understand enough off the bat, that this old man knew 4 languages. He told me in each language that he spoke that language and how well he spoke it. Italiano, which I came to learn was his native tongue, as he was from Sicilia. Fracese, or French…”tre bien,” he said with his thumb and two fingers together held out high. Deutsch…German…”spreche deutsch,” you could tell this wasn’t his best language, but I’m sure he could find his way around in it. And finally, after telling me of his travels to Tunisia, I found the old man also spoke Arabo…or Arabic, the native language of Tunisia next to French.

Each language the man spoke, he asked me if I spoke that language. I was able to tell him I spoke Italiano, although I knew very little “un poh” “Habla Espanol,” was another phrase I pulled out in desperation, hoping I might be able to find some tongue in which to better identify with my new friend. Unfortunately, he replied he spoke no Spanish. Finally he asked of my native language, with which I replied, English. This actually happened a few times over the course of the conversation, if nothing else, I would guess to make sure I was responding to the right question and understood what he was asking. “Mama mia!………..quattro lingui……….Inglese…….psh!” “Hahaha” With lost words in between, this was what my friend insisted in frustration. “I speak 4 languages!” with which he counted and named each one, “and you speak one.” “Of which is English, which is [no importante in Italia]”

This was truly frustrating. By now I was supremely interested in this old man and his life’s journeys, however I had no way to inquire further.

Our ‘conversation’ continued as he was able to tell me, or rather I was able to finally understand, as I mentioned earlier that he was from Sicilia. He had travelled to Tunisia from what I could infer, and had spent time in a French school perhaps when he was younger. I am still unsure of his history with German, although after so many languages, I suppose one more is of no great difficulty. In my best efforts of fishing for words and linguistic creativity I was able to tell him that I was studying architecture in Rome (studio architettura in Roma) I linked that to my reasoning for being in Perugia, and told him how we traveled from Rome, to Spoleto, Spoleto to Assisi, Assisi to Perugia, and that later that day we would travel back to Rome. Towards the end of our conversation Emile asked my age. Fumbling with my numbers, he told me “scribble!” pointing to my sketchbook. I did after all have a pad of paper and pencil right in front of me. I wrote 24, and he pronounced “ventiquattro.” I asked of his age, and to my surprise he wrote 87, “ottanta-sette.” Now I really was interested in his story. Finally we wrote our names down and pronounced them to one another. I now knew the man I was conversing with went by Emile.

After nearly 40 minutes had passed in our exchange of phrase and frustration, Emile complimented me again on my sketch of the fountain we looked out onto from our bench, said what I’m sure was the equivalent of a “nice to meet you,” and departed off across the piazza.

“Come si diche…’I have a lot to learn’…in Italiano?”

*Originally published on University of Idaho Rome Study Abroad Blog “Idaho-Roma” :
idahoroma.blogspot.com/2009/07/lost-in-translation.html

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